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Vol. 32 No. 3
May-June 2010

Making an imPACt | Recent IUPAC technical reports and recommendations that affect the many fields of pure and applied chemistry.
See also www.iupac.org/publications/pac

Terminology for Reversible-Deactivation Radical Polymerization (IUPAC Recommendations 2010)
Aubrey D. Jenkins, Richard G. Jones, and Graeme Moad
Pure and Applied Chemistry, 2010
Vol. 82, No. 2, pp. 483–491

This document defines terms related to modern methods of radical polymerization, in which certain additives react reversibly with the radicals, thus enabling the reactions to take on much of the character of living polymerizations, even though some termination inevitably takes place. In recent technical literature, these reactions have often been loosely referred to as, inter alia, “controlled,” “controlled/living,” or “living” polymerizations. The use of these terms is discouraged. The use of “controlled” is permitted as long as the type of control is defined at its first occurrence, but the full name that is recommended for these polymerizations is “reversible-deactivation radical polymerization.”

http://dx.doi.org/10.1351/PAC-REP-08-04-03


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