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Vol. 35 No. 3
May-June 2013

Making an imPACt | Recent IUPAC technical reports and recommendations that affect the many fields of pure and applied chemistry.
See also www.iupac.org/publications/pac

Methods of Measurement and Evaluation of Natural Antioxidant Capacity/Activity (IUPAC Technical Report)

Reşat Apak, et al., Pure and Applied Chemistry, ASAP article; Published online 2013-02-26

The chemical diversity of natural antioxidants (AOXs) makes it difficult to separate, detect, and quantify individual antioxidants from a complex food/biological matrix. Moreover, the total antioxidant power is often more meaningful to evaluate beneficial health effects because of the cooperative action of individual antioxidant species. Currently, there is no single antioxidant assay for food labeling because of the lack of standard quantification methods. Antioxidant assays may be broadly classified as the electron transfer (ET)– and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT)–based assays. The results obtained are hardly comparable because of the different mechanisms, redox potentials, and pH and solvent dependencies of various assays. This report will aid the identification and quantification of properties and mutual effects of antioxidants, bring a more rational basis to the classification of antioxidant assays with their constraints and challenges, and make the results more comparable and understandable.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1351/PAC-REP-12-07-15


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