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Vol. 28 No. 3
May-June 2006

Making an imPACt | Recent IUPAC technical reports and recommendations that affect the many fields of pure and applied chemistry.
See also www.iupac.org/publications/pac

Guidelines for Terminology for Microtechnology in Clinical Laboratories (IUPAC Technical Report)

Peter Wilding, Thomas Joos, Larry J. Kricka, and Leming Shi
Pure and Applied Chemistry
Vol. 78, No. 3, pp. 677–684 (2006)
doi:10.1351/pac200678030677

There is no formal terminology used to describe the scope and use of microtechnology in the clinical laboratory. For many laboratory scientists, the word "microchip" is synonymous with high-density microarrays used primarily for investigating gene expression. This document proposes a system of "categories" and "descriptors" that facilitate the classification of a microfabricated device (MFD) in a way that communicates details of its function and analytical role, and describes the analytical principle involved and the methods and materials used for its manufacture. Adoption of this system would enable scientists to employ four descriptors that clearly delineate the function, analytical role, and chemical or physical principle involved in the device.

Examples of microfabricated devices (MFD) and descriptions. The MFD categories are: A, microfluidic; B, micro-electronic; C, microarray; D, chemically reactive component-based; E, individually addressable; and F, micro-electromechanical. See full text for details.

www.iupac.org/publications/pac/2006/7803/7803x0677.html


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